Tag Archives: ivory burn

Ivory: what to do with it?

There’s a lot of it lying around, stashed away in safe houses under the tightest lock and key in Africa.

Kenya’s government burnt all of theirs in a very bold statement recently to drive home the point that there’s no use for ivory in an, ideally, obsolete trade. So just burn the things. And so they did. After all the black smoke rose into the skies and the tusks and horns reduced to ashes, there’s calm again and it seems like everyone’s on board.

But not quite so. A few African countries including S Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe wish to sell their ivory stockpiles. Their rationale is that the increased supply of ivory should lower the market price of tusks, which should reduce the killing because it won’t be as lucrative for the poachers. The funds could also be used for conservation, apparently.

It is all very interesting thinking, and applying rudimentary economic models to a complex situation might not work. Neither does assuming that funds generated from the sale will actually go to conservation. It is not new news that some of these countries could do with extra revenue to help national development either.

In September, big brother CITES will hold a roundtable in Johannesburg to determine what will happen.

At the end of the day, the real premise of why we should stop the trade should not be lost: that elephants are important, and that the trade must be stopped, in all cases and scenarios, and soon. Hopefully, Africa will reach a unified stance on how they view the trade so that a concerted effort is made to stop the elephants from being poached, once and for all.


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Ivory and ashes

Well done President Uhuru Kenyatta for creating the largest ivory burn in history, and all the global alliances that came together at the summit on the weekend to stand in solidarity against the ivory trade. May this positive momentum continue and trigger more awareness, policy change, greater anti-corruption measures and on-the-ground enforcement to stamp out this trade once and for all. May we also remember the 7000 elephants that these tusks came from and the 20-33 thousand elephants that are killed every year. Innocent and beautiful. Rest in peace.

Tusks on fire

In under an hour, the largest ivory burn in history will take place. In this symbolic event, 105 tonnes of elephant ivory and 1.5 tonnes of rhino horn will go up in flames in 11 large pyres in Nairobi National Park. World leaders, politicians, conservationists, celebrities and the media are present, and the world watches on as a landmark event in the battle to stop the ivory trade begins. The burn sends a clear message: the ivory has no economic value, and the elephant is worth more alive. It’s time to stop the trade once and for all.

Making space for giants

On April 30, 120 tonnes of seized ivory will be piled high and lit in a pyre at Nairobi National Park. These tusks are of course only a fraction of the ivory that comes from the 33,000 elephants that are killed every year.

The ivory burn is set to take place while movers and shakers from the continent will come together at a summit for The Giants Club, an initiative started by the presidents of Kenya, Uganda, Gabon and Botswana to save the African elephant from extinction. Hosted by Kenya’s president Uhuru Kenyatta, celebrities, global business leaders, senior conservationists and elephant-protection experts will be coming together over April 29 and 30 in Nairobi to discuss the way forward and to forge new plans to reach the goal of protecting at least 10% of Africa’s elephants by 2020.

This summit will strengthen the home-grown, African-led drive to stop the trade. May this create another boost to escalate the efforts from the continent to protect these giants, and hopefully complex issues including corruption and lack of enforcement can be addressed so that the murder of elephants can be stopped once and for all.