Tag Archives: ugandan railway

Tsavo Man-Eaters strike again

The sons and daughters of the man-eating lions of Tsavo strike again.

Well- not really. Just a swipe.

We’ve heard about how in 1898 they killed and ate 135 Indian railway workers as they toiled on the Ugandan Railway. Today, as the railway is currently being replaced, the Chinese workers have been told to work with caution as a KWS ranger last year was attacked while guarding a section of the railway. Could it be a descendant of the famous Man-Eaters of Tsavo?

For those who like learning a little about history through movies, check out Ghosts in the Darkness starring Val Kilmer, a nice film that tells the story of probably the most notorious lions in history. For those who want to see these unusually large and short-maned beauties in the flesh- although they’re stuffed- they’re sitting there waiting to ea- I mean greet you at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. If you want to see their descendants, why not head to Tsavo, hang out with the railway workers and try your luck. 🙂

May these famous Man-Eaters forever remain notorious in our hearts, and may we learn from this that lions are not to be messed with.

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Extinction means no turning back

Kenya’s multi-billion dollar Standard Gauge Railway project will cut through 2 major national parks in Nairobi and Tsavo. In the largest infrastructure project since Kenya became independent in 1963, replacing the old Ugandan Railway, there’s a lot resting on its success, which is anticipated to massively boost economic development, regional integration, and social and political development.

Set to be completed by 2017, construction is reportedly driving wildlife out of Nairobi NP, which has recently resulted in lost lions and sadly the tragic and public death of 13-year old Mohawk the lion 20 days ago. Soon, construction will run through Tsavo NP, which is home to about 12,000 elephants. The balance between economic development and wildlife conservation appears increasingly difficult to strike with time. Species are fast becoming critically endangered, and some rest dangerously on the precipice of extinction, like the African elephant. If things continue the way they are, it’s expected they’ll be extinct within one generation.

While consultation between key wildlife management authorities, the planning ministries of the government and CBRC, the building contractor, are ongoing- the stark truth must be realised that habitat loss and the displacement of wildlife will catalyse the decreases in population numbers and the anticipated extinction of key species. At that point, the damage will be final. Irreversible, and no turning back. Something that no economic gain will ever be able to help, and will, in fact, represent a reversal of a nation’s development.